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dc.contributor.authorLópez Samanés, Álvaro 
dc.contributor.authorDel Coso, Juan
dc.contributor.authorHernández Davó, José Luis
dc.contributor.authorMoreno Pérez, Diego
dc.contributor.authorRomero Rodríguez, Daniel
dc.contributor.authorMadruga Parera, Marc
dc.contributor.authorMuñoz Moreno, Alejandro 
dc.contributor.authorMoreno Pérez, Víctor
dc.date.accessioned2021-01-29T09:25:07Z
dc.date.available2021-01-29T09:25:07Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.issn0860-021Xspa
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10641/2200
dc.description.abstractTo date, there is a lack of information about the optimal conditions of the warm-up to lead to a better performance in elite tennis players. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of two different warm-up protocols (dynamic vs. self-myofascial release with foam rolling) on neuromuscular variables associated with physical determinants of tennis performance. Using a crossover randomised experimental design, eleven professional men tennis players (20.6 ± 3.5 years) performed either a dynamic warm-up (DWU) or a selfmyofascial release with foam rolling (SMFR) protocol. DWU consisted of 8 min of dynamic exercises at increasing intensity and SMFR consisted of 8 min of rolling on each lower extremity unilaterally. Just before (baseline) and after completing warm-up protocols, players performed a countermovement jump (CMJ), the 5-0-5 agility test, a 10-m sprint test and the Straight Leg Raise and Thomas tests to assess range of motion. Compared to baseline, the DWU was more effective to reduce the time in the 5-0-5 test than SMFR (-2.23 vs. 0.44%, respectively, p = 0.042, ηp2 = 0.19). However, both warm-up protocols similarly affected CMJ (2.32 vs. 0.61%, p = 0.373, ηp2 = 0.04) and 10-m sprint time changes (-1.26 vs. 1.03%, p = 0.124, ηp2 = 0.11). Changes in range of motion tests were also similar with both protocols (p = 0.448–1.000, ηp2 = 0.00–0.02). Overall, both DWU and SMFR were effective to prepare well-trained tennis players for highly demanding neuromuscular actions. However, DWU offered a better preparation for performing change of direction and sprint actions, and hence, in high-performance tennis players, the warm-up should include dynamic exercises.spa
dc.language.isoengspa
dc.publisherBiology of Sportspa
dc.rightsAtribución-NoComercial-SinDerivadas 3.0 España*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/es/*
dc.subjectPost-activation potentiationspa
dc.subjectDynamic stretchingspa
dc.subjectVertical jumpspa
dc.subjectSprintspa
dc.subjectRange of motionspa
dc.subjectRacket sportsspa
dc.titleAcute effects of dynamic versus foam rolling warm-up strategies on physical performance in elite tennis players.spa
dc.typejournal articlespa
dc.type.hasVersionAMspa
dc.rights.accessRightsopen accessspa
dc.description.extent402 KBspa
dc.identifier.doi10.5114/biolsport.2021.101604spa
dc.relation.publisherversionhttps://www.termedia.pl/Acute-effects-of-dynamic-versus-foam-rolling-warm-up-strategies-on-physical-performance-in-elite-tennis-players,78,42643,0,1.htmlspa


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